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Intransitive Grime Dice

Use the might of maths to beat your friends!

Intransitive Grime Dice

Use the might of maths to beat your friends!

artikel nummer: 13386

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De omschrijving van dit product is helaas alleen in het Engels. We werken aan de vertaling. Excuses voor het ongemak.
Even before most of us would've been able to write or pronounce the word "transitivity" correctly, the school of hard knocks taught us what this mathematical principle is all about: if Clara is strong enough to take Paul's lunch money and Peter can rob Clara, then Peter is also stronger than Clara. That's transitivity. For some reason, the notion that all advantages are transitive has been burned into our minds over the years, even though easy games like Rock-Paper-Scissors are non-transitive ...

And then there are fun maths games that will totally shake up everything you've ever believed in. May we present Grime Dice! Depending on the version you choose, this set contains either 5 or 10 dice that will allow you to challenge up to two friends to a game. Statistically speaking, you have a higher chance of beating them, no matter which dice* they pick. Even if you explain the rules and the mechanics behind the dice, you will win at an above-average rate!

But don't worry, we're not talking about black magic – it's just simple intransitivity! Because as soon as you know in which order the dice beat each other, you can adapt and modify your strategy. You can remind yourself of the proper order by either counting the letters of each colour (RED > BLUE > OLIVE ...) or putting the colours into their alphabetical order (BLUE > MAGENTA > OLIVE ...). Don't worry, the mechanics are explained in the included instruction, as well ;).

If we've managed to spark your interest in intransitivity, you can find Dr James Grime's (University of Cambridge) article that started the Grime Dice here.

*To quote the creators: "Yes, we know the singular of 'dice' is technically 'die'. Never say die."